Monday, November 03, 2008

A word by any other word.

This week's word is:

calimere.

I have no idea what it means yet, just found it today as the word verification code to place my comment on the previous post. It could either have something to do with potives - maybe a piece of equipment; perhaps some type of swamp, or the name for a place... hmmm.

It is always a joy to find new things that grow the Half-Continent and once I have settled on new word and its meaning, or developed a concept further, though it might be freshly minted it always feels like it has ever been that way far back into time. Odd, huh?

32 comments:

Noelle said...

I love it when this happens. I named an entire family after welsh hymn tunes once. Oh, and I got the name "Fycedie" from the points F, Y, C, and D in a geometry problem I was doing.

The verification word for me is "esterma."

Sam Hranac said...

Sounds like a lotion that sticks to the skin and evolves into a warm, soft sweater. A polymer, cashmere sort of thing.

No?

Anna said...

think it sounds like the greek word for hello. "mere" gets me thinking of the ocean/sea. Mare Balitcum, for example.

Emperor said...

You get the strange words from post conformation codes? Wow, maybe I should do that seeing as how uncreative I am and my character always end up with generic names such as "John Smith."

Noelle- Just to wrap something up from the last post although I did say the comment was cynical I did agree with you and thought that the comment was completely true.

Also, does anybody here dislike it when people make up opinions on books ect. Without reading them? I know I did it in the past esspecially with the Harry Potter books but I'm trying to stop.

portals said...

Mr Cornish- I am very glad we will not meet Gosling Freckle Bookchild, and about words, I love most of your the words you make and I think calimere is a great one to add to them. Does the Haacobin Empire have any enemies besides monsters and the Turkmen (if they are still there)?
Emperor-
No, I think it shows intelligence to be able to formulate an opinion based on a variety of sources, even if they all go against your final opinion. Jokes, jokes

Emperor said...

Portals- So what were your sources for saying that the movie we were talking about in English today is the worst movie ever? Was it the overwhelming number of 10/10 reviews? or was it the journalists telling us to go and see it twice? Just an inoccent question.

Noelle said...

"Calimere" is somewhat similar in sound to "calamine," which is 'a pink powder consisting of zinc carbonate and ferric oxide, used to make a soothing lotion or ointment.'

Allen said...

First thing that popped into my head was it could be a word for an interestingly coloured mare. A kind of calico horse. Perhaps that's a little obvious however...

Mr. Cornish,
Stayed up till 2 finishing lamplighter last night. Started reading it 4 days ago. Congratulations on creating such an enjoyable series. I gave a copy of the Foundling to my sister to read while she's recovering from a recent surgery.

-Allen

D.M. Cornish said...

My pleasure, allen!

Good ideas for 'calimere' - it almost made it as a place name into Book 3, but did not quite work.

I think I might attempt to answer your question in a post soon, portals.

Ben Bryddia said...

I pray your sister gets ready soon, Allen.

On subject, calimere is a more vulgar term for the calamarius (Tutin name for squid. See calamary in the dictionary). Since the Tutin root refers to a pen, and hence ink, some scholars suggest Tutin vinagaroons named it for its ability to stain the already ichorish waters with its ink.

A habilist who concocts various inks for printing may also be called a 'calimere' or even ‘calim’ in some parts, though they never use the name themselves.
If those don't qualify as crazy then I'm losing my touch.
-Ben.

portals said...

Stangely enough, Today while at fencing practice, I thought I heard someone say calimere.
I have some names that I made up (they're not really meant to be serious).
Valleyvaun, Vickenvaul, Vausenvelt, Vacrevaur, Vackensnak.
If you guys are interested in American politics, type 'Mrs Palin song' into YouTube. It is funny, clever, and not offensive.
Noelle-
I used to use calamine lotion when I was bitten by mosquitos.

E N Reinmuth said...

Most of my Character names come from just scribbling lines in the bottom corner of the page and shapes become words. 'Least that's how I got Szjeccoiye, Faosa, Lucieve and Moem. Right now my Confirmation code is Beshe, be looking out for a new character from me with that name...

And another, Micked. I should post comments more often :D

monday said...

dinaths, says the word verification now.
heheh. i wrote an entire list or characters from those once; the epic adventures of Ervpi, i think, and his arch-nemesis Axebeobb...

does it ever strike you that lots of fantasy names look better spelled backwards than forwards?

Noelle said...

My word verification is "sphie." That's when you spy on someone but you chicken out halfway through and leave. Example: "I sphied because I was certain they could see me."

portals said...

Obama won!

monday said...

sedictic!

: a tendency of people with cultivated facial hair to absentmindedly stroke their beard and/or mustache while they discourse.
''Well, technically...' began Seth, sedicticating and raising a single cynical eyebrow.'

Emperor said...

Yep, as Portals already said, it's offical Barack Obama is the 44th Presidents of the United States of America. Can't wait to see his acceptance speech.

Pearlius said...

Sounds like a name of a horse... Oh woe is me, being is uncreative and all. Mine's Auleves, by the way. Sounds like some kind of olives that grow in Autumn.

And to Emperor, yes in fact, I have. On the series Twilight. I have read about half a line and decided to not any more, while every other girl in my school goes crazy and swoons at the very mention of Edward Cullen and... to be frank, it's driving me crazy.

portals said...

Pearlius-
It is scarier when boys get obsessed with it

D.M. Cornish said...

Excellent word definitions monday and noelle, you had me chuckling heartily, espicially given that I am a rather sedictic fellow myself.

My neice is right into the Twilight series a tad baffling because before that she would not even look at a book. Thank you Ms Meyer!

"loarati: those of low station who think themselves learned."

monday said...

*glows* thank you
i have a very sedictic friend, as it happens

Phyrippe: when a chair squeals across the floor and is mistaken for a bodily sound.

Noelle said...

Have you ever heard of a game called "Balderdash"? It's a game where a completely bizarre but real word, like "liripoop" or "hinkembooby," is read out, and the players have to make up a definition that sounds real. Then the definitions are read out anonymously along with the real definition and the players have to vote for the one they think is real.

Ellyrig: A large, garish wagon or vehicle, specifically built to attract attention, and often used as a location for parties. For example, Oscar Mayer Weinermobile is an ellyrig.

Mindless said...

Calimere, Calimere...
Cali, for warm, from "Climate" and, um... "California"
Mere for swamp, bog, lake, from "Mire" and Afrikaans word for lake "Meer" (Meerkats=Lake Cats, I studied this). So, Basically it is a mildly warm-ish, temperate swamp/lake. Maybe.
Me mum is on the last chapter of Lamplighter and she still hasn't gotten clued into the whole "Mannikin" thing yet...
She really likes it.
-Mindless

mindless said...

Oh, and I got "Froust" for my word verification...
Proust?
-Mindless

Anna said...

Which are these Twilight-books you are talking about? Are they any good?

Carlita said...

I know a lot of people who never struck me as the type to pay attention to vampire books go crazy over the Twilight series. I, on the other hand, have read a fair amount of vampire novels (which includes Bram Stoker's "Dracula") and I was so uninterested by Meyers' books, when I got ahold of the last Twilight book, I just skimmed it because I only wanted to know if Bella became a vampire.

My verification word: vangly - reminds me of a gangly vampire, possibly inept at using his or her fangs as well being all limbs.

Anna said...

Oh, a vampire-book! I loooove vampire-movies so this is perhaps something in my alley.

Susan said...

I am reading the twilight series. I enjoyed it, and became obsessed until I began to read the second book. After that it just began to bore me. Although it is an interesting read, considering I would normally have never gone near a vampire books, I still think it was missing something.

I know exactly how you feel about the Edward Cullen thing Pearlius! The majority of girls in my school are obsessed (and some guys too I must admit). I am looking forward to the first movie,(even though I must grumble about the actors as I think everyone does to just about every movie they watch XD) but I'm not expecting much from it.

Anyway enough talk about Twilight, this blog is about MBT... (As I'm still eagerly awaiting the appearance of #3)

Vahlaeity said...

As I desperately await MTB book 3 I must confess I did read all 4 Twilight Novels. The first was enchanting and sweet. The others... well the characters irritated me and the more the series progressed the more it seemed to unravel. Not to mention the heavy handed literary references.
Bring on MBT 3 I say!

crossed23 said...

It reminds me of a plant that would be growing in the woods, much like when Rosamund and Threnody were looking for the mushrooms, prob. to create a gel like solution like an aloe to cure burns or something like that. Just what it reminds me of when I saw the word.

crossed23 said...

It reminds me of a plant that would be growing in the woods, much like when Rosamund and Threnody were looking for the mushrooms, prob. to create a gel like solution like an aloe to cure burns or something like that. Just what it reminds me of when I saw the word.

kobo said...

Sounds like a sword, but not quite a sword more of a skewer,short and precise weapon, straight blade, increadibly narrow. very descrete, very sturdy. easily concealed up a sleve or in a long pocket, more of a feminine weapon, with a finly crafted handle.
That is just my idea, sorry about the horrible grammer.