Thursday, February 25, 2010

The deep questions of liff...

I take this brief moment to direct you to a post by ellaquin regarding the name change for the US editions of what will soon be (in the US and Canadia, at least) formerly known as "Monster-Blood Tattoo" (though it shall remain so for us here in the rest of the world).

Honestly, it is how I feel, but I am choosing to trust my editor and my publisher that they fathom their market better. I hope the name change does what they hope it will do. The next big question is, what do I name this blog then?

Also, I actually went to the Forum the other day and answered some questions - yes, actually answered some questions. May such wonders never cease!

20 comments:

ocicat said...

As long as they keep your lovely artwork on the cover! Any word on that?

Brandy said...

While I like 'Monster Blood Tattoo', I do understand the change in name for the US editions. It's been very hard to get a decent expression when I've told others about it. I can see how telling them 'The Foundling Trilogy' would interest them more than something they don't understand much until they read the books themselves.

As for the blog name, I think it remains perfect, seeing as how most people who would read it will understand the expression.

Peter Cooper said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Sam Hranac said...

If they would stop dumbing things down and homogenizing them for us in the US, maybe we would stop being such twits!

Sorry. Had to be said.

Sam of Seattle, WA

me said...

I agree with Sam, it does seem rather sad that there's this 'need' to rename the series for the US market.

However, as you say, these people should know their market...

Talisha: common fore-name for ladiess from Taswegia, specifically the towns of Chig's Well and Water-Bridge. Usually found betrothed to apprentice gastrineers called Barry.

Brandy said...

I don't think it's dumbing it down so much as giving the series a more dignified face for an older market. I know that saying this could possibly ignite some fires, considering that most of us here are likely adults, but we are the adults that saw more deeply into the name when others haven't. It could be that it's an American problem, certainly, but it's hard for many of my peers, let alone elders, to take the phrase seriously. It sounds like a young adult series, rather than the dumb-foundingly unique and beautifully-crafted world Mister Cornish has woven for us. I do believe that they do, in fact, know their market. It's too bad that not everyone can see the gems for what they are on first glance or hear-tell, certainly, but isn't that true of so many things?

monday said...

thing is, Brandy...
...had I [as technically an adult] never heard of the books and was going by title alone, I would not consider 'The Foundling Trilogy' particularly gripping or interesting. In fact, I'd think it was just some other pretentious copycat fantasy-cheesehead trying to be whimsical and cute, and I'd probably say 'pff' and walk away. [actually picking up the book and looking at it would change my mind in an instant, naturally, but this whole argument seems to be centered around the assumption that the title of a book is THE sole deciding factor in its appeal.]
That is of course merely personal opinion and doesn't make any difference at this point anyway.

longing for summer and The Corser's Hinge...

Brandy said...

You're absolutely correct, Monday, the argument being made is focused solely the title of the series and not the title of the book or the wonderful art on the cover. Or even the summation of the story. Something that will be in small letters above or below the title and dwarfed significantly by the art. In the end it is only part of the draw of actually seeing the books.

But had I not had such a glowing recommendation about the books, I would have overlook something summed up by the phrase 'Monster Blood Tattoo'. As much as I would like to think I would have been able to sense it's wonderfulness from beyond the veil, the fact is that I wouldn't have until, perhaps, by some chance far down the road, I would have seen a physical copy and become intrigued enough to read the back. This, in combination with the reactions I've gotten to it from others, is the reason for my side of the opinion.

Sadly, if 'The Foundling Trilogy' isn't enough to get someone interested, neither is the title of the first book. Simply 'Foundling'. At which point, half the battle is lost anyway.

Ultimately, however, the discussion is moot, of course. Some people will find the original name more appealing, some will find the new one more magnetic, and some would be most interested in 'Rossamund Bookchild' as Mister Cornish--and many others--prefer. I think I'm just hoping that upon this second sweep, more people will be enticed to read it, it doesn't matter why it worked.

Sam Hranac said...

I didn't mean to start a zarebor (mild conflict over something that cannot be changed). I just had to vent - it was building in me before that "Sorcerer's" Stone thing occurred a while back.

Anna said...

You never know how it will be changed into until the book/movie are out. sometimes it goes totally wrong. Like the americanized Pippi Longstocking. It´s nothing like the original at all. Sometimes it might be good but in this case.....

me said...

I wasn't influenced by the title into picking up the book in my local bookstore 4 or 5 years ago - it was the amazing illustration on cover, reading the blurb, and having a chat to the guy behind the counter (who said the illustrations were "sophisticated for a kids book"). But that's just my modus operandi (I can and do judge a book by it's cover, there's no shame in it).

I can imagine the title is a point of attraction for a lot of other readers. However, a good book can transend it's title. Nobody ever renamed the Harry Potter series for an older market (although they did change the covers - and I'm not suggesting Harry Potter is a shade on MBT!). I guess ultimately it's just marketing, and that should be informed by art, not informing it.

Tzerci: One of those sneezes that comes on half-way through saying something deeply profound, but goes away once you've lost the thread.

ellaquin said...

...I guess this all points to how varied people are in how they chose books. I think then that the author ought to be able to pick. But fact that what matters most is content which we all agree MBT (by any name) has.

I still find the name change unnecessary and annoying, but, I shall just go back to enjoying the series.

I came to this series as "an adult" (my age and reality are not the same) by spotting Lamplighter on the shelf. That title, and its thickness were the initial draws. After that the art and series name furthered my interest and the discovery that it was the second book and had PICTURES made me grab up The Foundling and become very happily obsessed.

Anonymous said...

I'm a YA librarian in the US & I constantly rave about how MBT is one of the best things I've read - I LOVE your stuff & can't wait for more. I do everything in my power to ensure that Foundling & Lamplighter are always checked out to somebody... which, owing to the title, is actually pretty hard. I hate to say it, but I know I could get more people interesting in your work with a different title. I realize that you don't like your publisher's idea, but if it gets your (amazing) work into the hands of more readers, is it such a bad thing?

-mr. eugene

monday said...

heck, in the end it seems that most of us are just glad the books exist at all :)

Brandy said...

Here, here, Monday!

Sam Hranac said...

There there!

scisestr: what happens when you run with scissors.

ms_ventress said...

yes! hoorah for MBT!!!

I must be kinda in a sleepy mood... and bumbling... but right after you (DMC) asked what you should name your blog after the name change made me think of that artist that just has a symbol for his name (formerly known as Prince)...

You could include a small "formerly known as" footer under the new title on the blog. Just so people don't think of the books as being separate if they have seen them in a bookstore before the title change.

And really as everyone agrees here... these books could be called anything, we are all happy that they exist. :)

Brandy said...

Mister Cornish, what is Sebastipole's full name? I'm dead curious, if you wouldn't mind.

D.M. Cornish said...

It's not a case of not "liking" the name change - indeed, I am a party to it. Truth be told, I am not especially attached to MBT as a title. I like it, of course - I chose it! - but sometimes I can see what some folks find "off-putting" in the words. A fair reaction, I suppose, though it is a pity that their response never goes deeper than this... Never-the-less, the person with the bills to pay and all is rather hopeful that the name change will indeed, Mr Eugene, get the book-formerly-known-in-the-US-as-MBT into more readers' hands.

As to the covers ocicat, well I was too wrapped up in Book 3, I am afraid, that though the chance to do the new illos was offered to me, I turned it down. So it has someone else' marks on it too now. I shall see if I can show 'em to you all sometime soon.

And Sebastipole's full name, Brandy? Well, I have to confess he has always just been Sebastipole to me (dare I admit such a thing?)

Anna said...

Oh, I always thought that MBT was the series name, not the books name. Foundling and Lanmplighter as titles but MBT as the series name. (Not very english thinking today).